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Flatbush – Photos, Comments, from the Seminar

Where the Bike Lane Ends
Hosted by Flatbush Mutual Aid
Feb 19th 2013

Thanks to all who attended, especially my host Maikel Carder of Flatbush Mutual Aid. I enjoyed every minute. The appreciation expressed by many of you was very gratifying. I’m glad we’ve had this experience together.

You comments here on Virtuous Bicycle (scroll down) form a valuable record of what you learned and what you thought. I can’t thank you enough for recording your impressions. I’d love to hear how it goes and if the session has influenced your riding experience.

Here are some photos from the seminar in the historic Flatbush Reformed Church Gym. Thanks to Bennett Beckenstein for lugging his cameras and good will.

Best wishes to all my new friends in Flatbush!

Lance

Where the Bike Lane Ends

Diagram – “Now he’s virtually invisible. He’s in STEALTH mode!”

 

Where the Bike Lane Ends

A Successful Negotiation with a Driver! “Toot!”

 

Where the Bike Lane Ends

Some basic, and some assertive signaling technique: Signaling Left, Right, and Stopping, along with “Go Past Me!”, “Stay Back!”, and “Thank You!”

 

Maikel, my kind and gracious host. Contact Maikel to learn more about Flatbush Mutual Aid: "FMA is a group of friends and neighbors active in community empowerment projects here in Flatbush" maikelstonesoup@hotmail.com

Maikel, my kind and gracious host. Contact Maikel to learn more about Flatbush Mutual Aid: “FMA a group of friends and neighbors active in community empowerment projects here in Flatbush” maikelstonesoup@hotmail.com

Bessie Ryan shows off her FREE DOT helmet. (She called 311) NICE HELMET!

Bessie Ryan shows off her FREE DOT helmet. (She called 311) NICE HELMET!

 

Where the Bike Lane Ends

Valuable prizes were awarded in the Raffle – this Digital Pressure Gauge is worth over $4.50 !

 

Where the Bike Lane Ends

Joe’s on board with the Hi-Vis concept. Hey Joe! I see you!

Joe Sharkey won the GRAND PRIZE - a CycleAware helmet mirror, courtesy CycleAware.com. Contrats Joe!

Joe Sharkey won the GRAND PRIZE – a CycleAware helmet mirror, courtesy CycleAware.com. Contrats Joe!

 

About the author

Lance Jacobs

A native New Yorker, biking has been part of my life from my paper route in 5th grade, through my international tours on 4 continents. Now, as a League Certified Instructor (LCI #3507), my focus is on studying and teaching the best way to ride in NYC's unique street environment. I love cycling and I love my city. I believe riding our streets can be stress free when approached with some solid skills, some basic knowledge, and the right frame of mind.

3 comments

  1. Rachel Cantor

    Dear Lance,

    Thanks so much for putting on this workshop (and thanks also to Maikel and Flatbush Mutual Aid)! As you know, I haven’t ridden a bike in a few decades (!) and am more than nervous about the idea of riding in NYC traffic. Your seminar gave me specific tips for navigating traffic and, equally important, a general way to think about riding, which makes me think that maybe I can do this after all! I also appreciated your even-handed presentation and good humor! Good luck w/these!

    Warmly,
    Rachel Cantor

  2. Bob Pandolfo

    Lance,
    Very useful info, used a few techniques myself, going home via, Church and Westminster. Learned several good moves, you can teach an old dog new tricks! Will share last night with some fellow bikers. And I appreciate the way you handled opposing views last night, firm yet respectful.
    Bob Pandolfo

  3. Meg Feeley

    Dear Lance:

    Thanks so much for presenting tonight at Flatbush Mutual Aid at Flatbush Reformed Church. You may have noticed that the location offers no easy ways to leave by bike: you must go on busy Church Avenue and then, in my case, South on Ocean Avenue or Flatbush Avenue, both busy four-lane, two-way streets.

    In the past, I was so determined to avoid these streets that I did the alternative: bike the wrong way down E 21st Street (done once) or walk the bike on the sidewalk down E 21st (done another time).

    Tonight, with lights on, I rode up to Church, taking the lane twice to make left turns; first on Church, then on Ocean. I hung back a bit and sure ‘nough, had the road pretty much to myself. Spotted a double-parked car ahead, and moved into the left lane with lots of visibility and notice. Signaled a right onto Tennis Court, and then a left onto busy, dark but wide one-way E 18th Street (with cars on either side), With enough room to share the road, I waved a few cars past me and got a friendly wave! On the first day!

    I still have to unlearn my left handed right-hand turn sign, but I felt more aware, assertive and controlled tonight. And I rode FASTER. Did not think that faster would be safer, but yes — and, presumably, it’s a better ride. Will be practicing. No fear!!!! I do not think this mode of riding is incompatible with riding with one’s own safety in mind, first.

    Thank you for taking this on.
    Meg Feeley

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